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Intently Replaces Conventional Advertisements with Lovely Graphics

replaces ads with positive message

Ad blockers are some of the more useful tools available that help filter out ads from apps, games or browsers which may annoy and distract the users. However, in the process of filtering out those ads, these ad blockers tend to leave a site with more blank space, which can make the website look emptier.

Detecting Ads Blocker with jQuery

Detecting Ads Blocker with jQuery

For many websites that publish content for free, advertisements (or ads) are one of their primary sources for…Read more

If having blank space on a website doesn’t appeal to you, then Intently may just be your ideal ad blocker. Usable on Chrome, Firefox and Safari, Intently is an atypical ad blocker. Unlike most ad blockers that remove the ad space directly, Intently replaces the ads with images of its own.

replaces ads with positive message

Intently works in a way that a user signs up to the service and chooses a theme of images that they would like to see. Once chosen, Intently would prompt the user to install the extension on their browser. After the Intently extension goes online, all ads would then be replaced by images that are relevant to the theme that was selected.

replace with relevant themereplace with relevant theme

Intently’s image library is sorted between two categories:

  • Free Channels – Image collections that everyone can access for free.
  • Premium Channels – Image collections that have certain restrictions.
free and premium channelsfree and premium channels

A standard Intently user can only subscribe to three Premium Channels. If they wish to subscribe

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Constructing a greater net for everybody

Screen Shot 2017-06-01 at 2.27.27 PM.png

The vast majority of online content creators fund their work with advertising. That means they want the ads that run on their sites to be compelling, useful and engaging–ones that people actually want to see and interact with. But the reality is, it’s far too common that people encounter annoying, intrusive ads on the web–like the kind that blare music unexpectedly, or force you to wait 10 seconds before you can see the content on the page. These frustrating experiences can lead some people to block all ads–taking a big toll on the content creators, journalists, web developers and videographers who depend on ads to fund their content creation.

We believe online ads should be better. That’s why we joined the Coalition for Better Ads, an industry group dedicated to improving online ads. The group’s recently announced Better Ads Standards provide clear, public, data-driven guidance for how the industry can improve ads for consumers, and today I’d like to share how we plan to support it.

New tools for publishers

The new Ad Experience Report helps publishers understand how the Better Ads Standards apply to their own websites. It provides screenshots and videos of annoying ad experiences we’ve identified to make it easy to find and fix the issues. For a full list of ads to use instead, publishers can visit our new best practices guide.

As part of our efforts to maintain a sustainable web for everyone, we want to help publishers with good ad experiences get paid for their work. With Funding Choices, now in beta, publishers can show a customized message to visitors using

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Constructing a greater net for everybody

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The vast majority of online content creators fund their work with advertising. That means they want the ads that run on their sites to be compelling, useful and engaging ones that people actually want to see and interact with. But the reality is, it’s far too common that people encounter annoying, intrusive ads on the web—like the kind that blare music unexpectedly, or force you to wait 10 seconds before you can see the content on the page. These frustrating experiences can lead some people to block all ads—taking a big toll on the content creators, journalists, web developers and videographers who depend on ads to fund their content creation.

We believe online ads should be better. That’s why we joined the Coalition for Better Ads, an industry group dedicated to improving online ads. The group’s recently announced Better Ads Standards provide clear, public, data-driven guidance for how the industry can improve ads for consumers, and today I’d like to share how we plan to support it.

New tools for publishers

The new Ad Experience Report helps publishers understand how the Better Ads Standards apply to their own websites. It provides screenshots and videos of annoying ad experiences we’ve identified to make it easy to find and fix the issues. For a full list of ads to use instead, publishers can visit our new best practices guide.

The Ad Experience Report lists when we have identified ad experiences on a site that are likely to harm users or violate the Better Ads Standards.

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Extra advertisements transparency for publishers

Publishers are the backbone of the open web—the content creators, journalists, amateur videographers and our go-to guides for information. Fifteen years ago, we decided to help publishers make money from their content by starting AdSense, our first publisher platform. And today, our ad platforms are used by millions of publishers, large and small, as a way to grow their businesses. In 2016, we paid out more than $11 billion to our publisher partners from advertising.

Policies play an important role in protecting the open web. They ensure publishers have a sustainable way to make money through our ads platforms, setting rules about what we do and don’t allow. For example, publishers can’t just have a site full of ads. Our policies exist to balance publishers’ needs with those of our users, advertisers and all of the parties that depend on it to keep the open web going.

One of the top requests we hear from publishers is that they want more transparency about how we respond to policy violations on their content. They want more information about why we remove ads on their websites and more help to resolve issues quickly, minimizing the impact on their bottom line.

Today we’re announcing two updates, based on direct feedback from publishers, to how our policies are enforced and communicated to publishers.

Policy actions at the page level

We’re introducing a new technology for policy violations that allows us to act more quickly and more precisely when we need to remove ads from content that violates our policies. Historically, for most policy violations, we remove all ads from a publisher’s site. As we roll out page-level policy action as the new default for content violations, we’ll be able to stop showing ads on select pages, while leaving ads up on the rest of a site’s good content. We’ll

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Extra advertisements transparency for publishers

Publishers are the backbone of the open web—the content creators, journalists, amateur videographers and our go-to guides for information. Fifteen years ago, we decided to help publishers make money from their content by starting AdSense, our first publisher platform. And today, our ad platforms are used by millions of publishers, large and small, as a way to grow their businesses. In 2016, we paid out more than $11 billion to our publisher partners from advertising.

Policies play an important role in protecting the open web. They ensure publishers have a sustainable way to make money through our ads platforms, setting rules about what we do and don’t allow. For example, publishers can’t just have a site full of ads. Our policies exist to balance publishers’ needs with those of our users, advertisers and all of the parties that depend on it to keep the open web going.

One of the top requests we hear from publishers is that they want more transparency about how we respond to policy violations on their content. They want more information about why we remove ads on their websites and more help to resolve issues quickly, minimizing the impact on their bottom line.

Today we’re announcing two updates, based on direct feedback from publishers, to how our policies are enforced and communicated to publishers.

Policy actions at the page level

We’re introducing a new technology for policy violations that allows us to act more quickly and more precisely when we need to remove ads from content that violates our policies. Historically, for most policy violations, we remove all ads from a publisher’s site. As we roll out page-level policy action as the new default for content violations, we’ll be able to stop showing ads on select pages, while leaving ads up on the rest of a site’s good content. We’ll

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How you can Disable All Advertisements in Home windows 10

Stop Receiving Personalized Ads

Windows 10 may have been a free upgrade, however, it comes with ads pushed to the system using different avenues (even if you’ve upgraded for a fee, sadly). These ads appear at various places including Start menu, Action Center, Cortana as well as on the lock screen. These ads coax you to buy apps and services that you may or may not need.

Detecting Ads Blocker with jQuery

Detecting Ads Blocker with jQuery

For many websites that publish content for free, advertisements (or ads) are one of their primary sources for…Read more

Owing to the fact mentioned, many users find these ads intrusive enough to degrade the overall user experience. Fortunately, there exist some useful tricks to disable or block most of the advertisements and that’s what we’re going to discuss in this article.

Below is a list of places where ads are shown and the tricks to disable them safely. Are you ready? Let’s disable ads.

Stop getting personalized ads

Microsoft displays targeted ads on Windows 10 using a unique advertising ID. It tracks the app uses and Windows Store purchases to display personalized ads, which you’re most likely to click or follow. The best way to avert such targeted advertisements is to disable your advertising identity so that the company can’t show ads based on your interests. You can perform these steps to turn off your advertising ID:

  1. Open “Settings”, click “Privacy” and select “General”.
  2. Under “Change privacy options”, toggle off the option “Let apps use my advertising ID for experiences across apps”.
    Stop Receiving Personalized Ads

Also, please do the following steps in every installed browser in your system, including the Microsoft Edge, to get rid of personalized ads while browsing

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Full-Display Advertisements Coming to Instagram Tales; Insights, Too

Instagram announced that Instagram Stories has reached 150 million daily active users, and those users will soon start seeing full-screen ads.

The Facebook-owned photo- and video-sharing network also revealed the rollout of Stories insights within its Business Tools.

Instagram Stories launched last August and reached the 150 million DAU mark Wednesday after topping 100 million last October.

Instagram said in an Instagram for Business blog post that it will test immersive, full screen ads in Instagram Stories with more than 30 brands– including Capital One, General Motors (Buick), Maybelline New York, Nike, Yoox, Netflix, Qantas and Shiseido—and those ads will include targeting, reach and measurement capabilities for those brands.

The ads will also be sound-on, and Instagram said in its blog post:

With roughly 70 percent of watched Stories being sound-on, this immersive, full screen nature creates an intimacy with people like never before.

The new ads will roll out globally on the reach objective and to all interfaces “in the coming weeks,” Instagram said, adding that more direct-response options will follow “in the coming months.”

In addition to the brands mentioned above, accommodations network Airbnb has been testing the sound-on format with its Trips on Airbnb series of 15-second videos aimed at connecting travelers with local experts by interest, and its global head of social marketing and content, Eric Toda, said in the blog post:

Immersive storytelling through Instagram Stories engages and invites our community to be part of an adventure. Instagram provides us the perfect tools to build awareness around our recently launched product, Airbnb Experiences, handcrafted trips designed and led by our hosts. By creating and publishing experience-driven stories, we can truly captivate and reach travelers wishing to book aspirational trips on Airbnb.

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Fb Extends Dynamic Advertisements Concentrating on to Customers’ Net Exercise

Facebook extended the targeting capabilities of its dynamic ads to users’ web activity.

Director of product marketing Maz Sharafi spoke with Lauren Johnson of SocialTimes parent Adweek about the new targeting option, saying that advertisers previously were only able to target users who specifically viewed products on their websites or mobile applications.

Sharafi said as an example that the new targeting option now allows advertisers to retarget users who have been searching for red dresses across multiple retailers’ sites and who like posts and pages related to dresses, and he told Johnson:

The top feedback and most common type of feedback that we hear is, “Hey, can you help me drive sales beyond people visiting my website and app, including new customers?” What we can now do is say, “Who else is potentially in-market for these products?”

It automates the process of who it can show products to—it takes out a lot of the trial and error and complexity of being able to do this in a manual way. For example, to sell 1,000 products, you have to create almost 1,000 different ads to reach those products to different people. With dynamic ads, you’re effectively creating one.

Online furniture retailer Wayfair has been testing the ability to target dynamic ads based on users’ web activity, and director of marketing Jessica Jacobs told Johnson:

We can automatically reach a huge audience with personalized recommendations from our catalog of more than 7 million products. With dynamic ads, we are beating our customer acquisition efficiency target by more than 20 percent at a scale that is meaningful to our business.

Advertisers: What are your thoughts on this new targeting option?

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Fb Provides Dynamic Advertisements for Cellular App Installs

Facebook Thursday announced the launch of dynamic ads for mobile application installs.

The social network pointed out research from Gartner showing that smartphone sales were at least 10 percent higher in the fourth quarter of 2015 than in any other quarter that year, adding that purchases of smartphones lead to app downloads.

Facebook said in an email to SocialTimes:

App marketers will now have the ability to use dynamic ads to drive mobile app installs by targeting people who recently browsed their products. Advertisers can also use this tool to show relevant product ads to people who are most likely to install an app.

The social network also shared the following tips in a blog post:

As you build out your strategy, prioritize these three things: finding customers who take action beyond the install, driving valuable repeat actions (such as in-app purchases) and measuring the value of your marketing.

Find the right people: Businesses have already been using Facebook dynamic ads to find the people more likely to buy their products. Now we’re offering app marketers the ability to use dynamic ads to drive mobile app installs, just in time for the holiday and post-holiday spike in downloads. Advertisers can use dynamic ads to show relevant ads to people who are more likely to install their app, including people who recently browsed their products.

Businesses can also use app event optimization to identify the customers who are more likely to take valuable actions after downloading an app—such as completing a level in a game, booking a trip or making a purchase. Marketers are already seeing the value of this functionality; in fact, more than one-half of Facebook’s top 100 apps use app event optimization to reach high-value.

Drive repeat actions: Once the right customers have your app, the challenge is

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Recreation Makers’ Advert Technique: Much less TV, Extra Cross-Channel Concentrating on

SagiNiri

Mobile, video and programmatic advertising are growing rapidly, and marketers are looking to use new channels and technologies to get the most out of each media campaign.

As marketers buy programmatic ads across multiple platforms, advertisers need to reach out and engage with their users across these different channels at every stage of the consumer’s journey.

This is especially true in the mobile gaming market, where gaming apps are bountiful, highly competitive and carry high churn rates.

Mobile gaming is a hotbed for advertisers

The mobile game market is exploding, with hundreds of thousands of new game applications made available each year, and in 2016, they will generate more revenue than console or PC games for the first time ever.

Not surprisingly, the advertising market for video games is also growing at a rapid pace–especially with the rising popularity of new mobile ad formats for native, social media and in-app games.

Yet if you were to ask game-makers in 2015 how they attracted users, the common answer would have been television advertising–and that medium is still a force today. According to iSpot.tv, game developers spent an estimated $52.8 million on TV ads in September 2016, almost double the $27.2 million spent just one month prior–the bulk of which was spent by mobile gaming brands.

TV ads are clearly still relevant, but they’re only a small piece of the puzzle.

Traditional TV ads just don’t cut it

While game developers continue to spend big on TV ads, they need to recognize that traditional advertising channels are facing new forces of disruption. Most of today’s gamers are juggling multiple devices. In fact, more than one-half of U.S.-based internet users multitask with smartphones or computers while watching TV.

This mass rerouting of eyeballs should be concerning for game brands spending big money on TV ads. While TV marketers can

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