Google Classroom

Constructing #withClassroom: tales of actual faculties utilizing Classroom integrations

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A few years ago, we launched the Classroom API to make it easier for developers to integrate their applications with Classroom, and for administrators to manage classes. Since then, hundreds of applications have integrated with Classroom to help teachers gamify their classes, improve students’ writing skills, build interactive presentations and more.

Using the API, developers can build deep integrations that manage Classroom rosters, assignments and grades. Or they can simply embed the Classroom share button to let users quickly share content. For teachers and students, these integrations create a seamless experience between Classroom and their favorite education apps.

Valuable integrations have been built to support the needs of teachers and students in the classroom that showcase the creative possibilities available through the Classroom API. Today, we take a look at how some schools are using Classroom integrations.

Enriching lessons with rich content from BrainPOP

In the words of Mike Jones, a teacher at Illinois State University’s K-8 Lab School, “Class time is precious. Why would I want to waste any of it with a process that can easily be automated?”

Improved automation is one of the key reasons we’ve seen education applications integrate with Google Classroom and one of those applications is BrainPOP. BrainPOP offers digital educational content that engages students through animated movies, learning games, quizzes, concept mapping, movie-making, and more.

The team at BrainPOP recognized that manually setting up individual student accounts for My BrainPOP could be a tedious task for teachers. Utilizing the Classroom API, the team at BrainPOP developed an integration that allows teachers to import their classes directly into My BrainPOP, automatically creating single sign-on-ready, student accounts and allowing students to log into BrainPOP through the Google launcher menu. According to Jones, the integration “allows all staff to easily access the benefits of

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New Google Classroom options make it simpler to study, train, handle and construct

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Google Classroom is designed for everyone involved in a student’s education. More than 20 million educators and students use it to teach and learn together, as do administrators who oversee how this tool is used across classrooms, and developers who are building educational technology for the next generation. As everyone heads back to school to start the new semester, we’re releasing new Classroom updates designed specifically for each of these groups.

For students: individualized work for differentiated learning

We know that one-size-fits-all teaching doesn’t always meet students’ needs, and we’ve been impressed with the workarounds Classroom teachers have found to differentiate their instruction. Starting today, Classroom makes it a lot easier for teachers to assign work to individual students and groups based on their unique needs. As they’re creating an assignment, post or question, teachers can choose whether to share it with the entire class or just with a subset of students.

Juli Dalzell, a seventh-grade teacher at Thomas A. Blake Middle School in Medfield, MA, says she likes how the new feature lets her teach students who may grasp concepts at different paces. “I can assign different levels of questions or quantities of assignments,” says Dalzell. “Also, I can push out documents, such as answer keys, as students complete their assignments.”

With this feature, students can also discreetly receive extra practice if they’re struggling with a new subject. Sara Enberg, a library media specialist at River Willow Elementary School in Hudson, WI, says that the new update creates “an easy way to assign a reteaching or extension activity for students who are struggling… Just a quick simple video for a couple of students and they were back on track.”

For teachers: new notifications to manage student work

We understand the information overload that teachers feel

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